Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G in-depth review

The Galaxy A series of smartphones are renowned for their 4G/5G segmentation. We anticipated that this would finish in 2022, and on the A33, A53, and A73, it did. However, this treatment is still applied to the entry-level Galaxy A13 and Galaxy A23, and today we will be evaluating the 5G version of the Samsung Galaxy A23.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

It’s uncommon for these models to be identical to their LTE counterparts, but that is the case with the Galaxy A23 5G. In addition to the 5G modem, Samsung’s choice of the Snapdragon 695 5G chipset above the Snapdragon 680 enables the GPU to render the interface at up to 120 frames per second for more fluid action on the 6.6-inch PLS LCD 1080p screen.

Since this phone already has the new One UI 5 (with Android 13) update, we like the 120Hz increase because it can make things feel smoother. Although it may seem outmoded, the panel’s enduring droplet-shaped notch is not a major oversight in our opinion.

The phone has a flat Gorilla Glass front, a plastic frame, and a matte plastic back that are similar of the high-end Galaxy S22 series. It has the same straightforward design as the other Galaxy A phones. The Galaxy A23 5G model lacks water resistance; this feature is only available on models with AMOLED displays, such as the Galaxy A33 and upwards.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

We admire the Galaxy A23 5G’s camera equipment, even though it is intended for the entry-level market. It features four cameras on its back, including a 50MP OIS primary camera, a 5MP ultrawide camera, a 2MP macro camera, and a 2MP depth sensor. However, the 8MP selfie camera is a really simple piece of equipment.

The tri-card slot with a microSD tray, the 3.5mm audio jack, NFC, and the big 5,000 mAh with 25W cable charging capability are other noteworthy features.

If you’ve been following the most recent Galaxy A phones, the OLED panel and the ingress protection are the most noticeable omissions. Other strange things include the virtual proximity detection, which continues to be contentious, and the perplexing absence of an actual ambient light sensor. Additionally, the box does not have a charger.

Samsung galaxy A23 5G Unboxing

The Samsung Galaxy A23 5G comes packaged in a compact paper box together with a white USB-C cord. I’m done now.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

There is no charge, Headphones and screen protector in the Box.

Design

It’s good that all contemporary Galaxy A and Galaxy S phones are identical. As a result of the one-piece rear panel and the lack of a separate camera tile to break up the seamless design, Samsung has created a sleek shell that is elegant in its simplicity.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

To protect its display, the Galaxy A23 5G includes a flat Gorilla Glass 5 sheet. The plastic frame is substantial, constructed of plastic as well, and it has a small curve. The matte-finished plastic back is the next component.

If you’re bothered by the fact that fingerprints and smudges are likely to stick to the rear of our black model, we advise looking into the white, peach, and blue options instead. Over time, they also gather undesirable material, but because of their lighter colours, it is simply not noticeable.

There isn’t any ingress protection on the Galaxy A23 5G. Samsung is extending the IP67 rating to the Galaxy A33 this year.

Now let’s examine the Galaxy A23 5G in more detail.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

The 6.6-inch PLS LCD screen with expanded 1080p resolution is located at the front. With the droplet-shaped notch present, it has the same dimensions and resolution as the Galaxy A23 4G. Nevertheless, the frame rate has increased from 90Hz to 120Hz, perhaps due to the new, faster hardware.

The screen appears to be sufficiently bright and to have vibrant colours, but we shall discuss these points later.

The size of the other bezels could be more minimal, and there is a pronounced chin below the screen. However, these are excellent for an LCD-screen smartphone that is quite inexpensive.

Above the display notch, behind a slender outlet, is where the earpiece is located. No grille is discernible.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

The Galaxy A23 5G’s back is a well-known design, consisting of a single piece of plastic with a tiny bulge for its quad-camera arrangement. The 50MP primary camera, the 2MP depth sensor, the 5MP ultrawide camera, and the 2MP macro camera are all visible here. Next to them are the single-LED flash and the 2MP macro camera.

We enjoy this design and appreciate that Samsung has included it into the majority of its latest smartphones. From the flagship to the midrange phone, you receive their greatest design in this way.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

Two nano-SIM cards and a microSD card can fit in the Galaxy A23 5G’s tri-card slot. It is to the left.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

On the right, there are keys for volume and power/lock. The fingerprint scanner is integrated into the surface of the lock key and is constantly on, gratifyingly quick, and extremely accurate.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

The A23 5G has a lone microphone at the top.

The main microphone, USB-C port, loudspeaker, and 3.5mm audio jack are all located at the bottom.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

The Galaxy A23 5G has the same dimensions and weight as the Galaxy A23 and Galaxy A13 phones: 165.4 x 76.9 x 8.4 mm and 197g. However, the 6.4-inch Galaxy A33 5G is a hair shorter and lighter.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

We had a good experience using the Galaxy A23 5G; it’s a sturdy, well-built smartphone that provides a firm grip and feels safe in the hand. We didn’t think we required a case for protection or to make the grip better.

Display

The 6.6-inch PLS LCD screen of the Samsung Galaxy A23 5G is identical to the one on the 4G Galaxy A23 model, however the refresh rate has increased from 90Hz to 120Hz. The resolution of 1,080 x 2,408 pixels, or 400ppi, is appropriate for this price range. Gorilla Glass 5 is used as a flat piece of protection for the screen.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

We can’t claim that the return of the waterdrop-shaped notch is more offensive than the many little perforations. At least it seems more natural.

A wide colour gamut is supported by the display, although HDR video is not supported. No guarantees are made regarding a specific brightness either.

The proximity and ambient light sensors are absent from the Galaxy A23 5G, just like they were from the Galaxy A23 LTE. The closeness is what Samsung refers it as “virtual proximity detection,” a function that incorporates data from the selfie camera, accelerometer, and other sources (i.e. apps you are using). Even while it’s not as trustworthy as the actual thing, it generally works well.

Though puzzling, there is no ambient light sensor. The phone just uses the selfie camera for this, but it isn’t accurate or quick enough, and the auto-brightness control is all over the place – sometimes it would make the screen excessively bright at night or dim it in bright settings.

Now let’s discuss the panel’s maximum brightness. 430 nits of maximum brightness were recorded when the brightness slider was manually moved. The 1328:1 contrast ratio was great when combined with the relatively deep black level.

We finally managed to achieve a marginally better performance at 508nits and a contrast of 1254:1 after a protracted battle with the auto brightness behaviour.

Point white had a minimum brightness of 2.9 nits.

Color accuracy

The display settings do not offer any colour alternatives, so you are forced to use what you are given. The good news is that, except from the bluish whites and greys, the screen turned out to be reasonably accurate towards DCI-P3 targets.

Refresh rate

There are two display modes available in the Display Settings for the 120Hz display on the Galaxy A23 5G: Standard and Adaptive.

The Standard is always fixed at 60Hz, as would be expected.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

The Adaptive is not as adaptive as the name would imply; it switches back to 60Hz when you are not interacting with the screen, when you launch an incompatible programme, or when you are watching or streaming videos. It uses 120Hz for all compatible apps and the interface.

Battery life

The battery size of the Samsung Galaxy A23 5G is a sizable 5,000mAh, which is the same as that of the 4G model and many other phones with comparable prices. We anticipated a high durability rating because it boasts a 6nm Snapdragon 695 CPU and a rather efficient LCD screen.

We also got one! In our battery test, the Galaxy A23 5G achieved a score of 138 hours while passing all four test conditions: calls, web browsing, video playing, and standby performance.

Charging speed

Samsung’s 25W rapid wired charging is supported by the Galaxy A23 5G, but unlike the 4G model, it only comes with a USB-C connection out of the box. The 25W Samsung PPS adaptor must be purchased separately.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

With the aforementioned adaptor, we tried the phone, and the charging speed is indeed outstanding. In just 15 minutes, the battery went from dead to 30%, and at the 30-minute point, we recorded 58%.

Speaker’s

There is only one bottom-firing speaker on the Galaxy A23 5G. On our loudness test, it received a Very Good rating, and in practise, it does actually sound quite loud.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

The vocals are clear, there is only a slight bass presence, and the high range is adequate but not outstanding. Overall, we are pleased with the experience because the spectrum is balanced rather than leaning too far in either direction.

Software

Out of the box, our Samsung Galaxy A23 5G ran Android 12 with One UI 4, but after initial setup, we received notification that Android 13 had been updated with the new One UI 5. After the new software was installed, we looked over the phone.

The first difference we felt between One UI and One UI 4.0 was that One UI felt faster and smoother right away. The new features included in this One UI 5 upgrade, which adds a lot more functions than simply updating the OS to Android 13, are of course the next thing to mention.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

Core Other manufacturers occasionally overlook Android features when they upgrade their proprietary OS versions, but Samsung painstakingly incorporates them into its One UI. There aren’t many built-in Android 13 features this year, and the majority of them are concentrated on how Android’s Material Design appears visually. We are left with privacy and notification-focused changes since those are not applicable to Samsung’s own interpretation of how Android should look.

The system will ask you whether you want the app to send you alerts or keep them disabled by default once you instal it and run it for the first time. Controls for notifications are now more accessible and will always be visible near the top of the system menu. At the bottom of the notification panel, there is a direct access to the app’s internal notification settings. More precise control over the notification kinds that apps can deliver, including cards on the Lock screen, floating notifications, and badges.

It’s also possible to control the language separately for each app, which begs the question of why such a fundamental function wasn’t offered earlier.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

Because users frequently copy sensitive information like phone numbers, emails, credit card numbers, and even passwords to the clipboard, malicious apps would frequently exploit this vulnerability. As a result, Android 13 now deletes clipboard data after a set period of time.

Let’s now discuss One UI 5.

The overall performance of the OS, as we’ve already mentioned, is possibly one of the largest improvements. Samsung’s software has a reputation for being relatively sluggish since since the outdated TouchWiz. One UI is still falling behind of its competitors in this area, while being a vast improvement over its forerunners. both literally and metaphorically. One UI 5.0 attempts to remedy this, and to some extent it succeeds. Animations and transitions have been improved by Samsung, making them logically quicker and smoother. It everything seems more normal now.

To make it simpler to identify programmes and understand text, other aesthetic changes include improved contrast, new app icons, and artwork across the system menus.

The accent colour palette is once more generated automatically depending on your wallpaper, but this time the system provides you a wider selection of colour schemes and you can even use that palette for app icons.

Samsung A23 5G
colour palette. Image credit: GSMArena.com
Samsung A23 5G
colour palette. Image credit: GSMArena.com

Now that widgets may be layered, switching between stacked widgets only requires a swipe. Remember that not all widgets allow stacking, thus app developers may need to find a workaround shortly.

Samsung A23 5G
stacked widgets
Samsung A23 5G
stacked widgets
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
stacked widgets
Samsung A23 5G
stacked widgets
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
stacked widgets

Last but not least, each contact’s animation background is now automatically selected by the default dialer for each contact, making it somewhat simpler to tell who is calling at a glance. Unless, of course, you choose to give a sticker, AR emoji, or photo of your choosing.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Image credit: GSMArena.com

One UI’s logic remains the same. Two monochromatic shortcuts—dialer and camera—are present on the lock screen in the same place as before. The majority of people will probably utilise the side-mounted fingerprint reader as their preferred unlocking method, but face unlock is still an option. Since it only uses the selfie camera, it can occasionally be more practical but is typically less secure.

As previously mentioned, the lock screen is mostly unchanged and offers a variety of personalization choices. The Samsung Galaxy A23 5G lacks an Always-on Display.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Lockscreen and security option
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Lockscreen and security option
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Lockscreen and security option
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Lockscreen and security option
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Lockscreen and security option
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Lockscreen and security option

You add widgets, folders, and app shortcuts to homescreens. Google’s homescreen is always on the left. App Drawer is also available.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
One UI 5
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
One UI 5
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
One UI 5
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
One UI 5
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
One UI 5

A quick swipe up with two fingers from the bottom edge of the screen will open two apps in split screen mode. The recent applications option also allows for the same action.

The new notification features included with Android 13 have previously been discussed, but Samsung went above and above to include a few minor upgrades of its own. Your first observation will be that notification cards in the drop-down menu now have a larger app icon and a corresponding colour. Those notification cards’ text alignment has also been improved for greater reading.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

Samsung is launching Routines, a feature akin to Focus from Apple. Depending on what you are doing at the moment, you can select a mode and carry out certain tasks, modify sound profiles, display settings, notification settings, etc. For example, the driving Routines profile can be configured to automatically start Spotify and enable DnD mode. You may even make some Routines be triggered by activities of your choosing, such activating the hotspot or switching to aeroplane mode.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Modes& routine
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Modes& routine
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Modes& routine
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Modes& routine
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Modes& routine

Samsung also made it slightly simpler to connect with neighbouring devices. You can find devices that can connect to Smart View (read: screen cast) or, in some cases, Samsung DeX in the Connected devices sub-menu. Discovering and streaming audio on Chromecasts is also simpler. Chromecasts in your immediate area will show up on the quick panel when you play sound from your phone.

You can select to hide your notifications after casting the phone’s screen to a device like a TV so that others cannot read private information from your phone.

The Edge panels—those windows that appear when you swipe in from the side and offer tools and shortcuts to apps and contacts—as well as other well-known proprietary Samsung features are featured in One UI 5. Game launchers, which serve as a central location for all of your games and offer choices for reducing distraction while playing, are here to stay.

Other than having a proprietary file manager and an internal gallery app, the software package is comparable to that of other Samsung phones. Naturally, Samsung’s web browser for the Internet is also accessible.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Gallery. Image credit: GSMArena.com
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
File manager. Image credit: GSMArena.com
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Edge panels. Image credit: GSMArena.com
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Edge panels. Image credit: GSMArena.com

New features are added to the built-in photo and video editors. You can now edit GIFs in more ways, draw precise shapes over movies and photographs with the pen tool, and add 60 new emoji stickers to your still photos and video clips. You can now make stickers from any image.

Smaller system-wide improvements include expanded search in the My Files app, DnD mode exceptions (apps of your choosing won’t be affected by DnD), the ability to completely disable RAM Plus through Device care, auto background optimization that keeps the system running smoothly, the ability to set up more timers simultaneously, redesigned Digital Wellbeing, etc.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Edge Plus. Image credit: GSMArena.com
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Ram plus Image credit: GSMArena.com

There are a few nice new improvements but no significant modifications to the camera’s functionality or new modes. A unique watermark or a date can be added to each picture you take, and the telephoto camera also supports Food mode, making it easier than ever to zoom in and out with one hand.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
watermark Image credit: GSMArena.com

Performance

The Snapdragon 695 5G chipset is used by the Galaxy A23 5G. Since the Snapdragon 680 that powered the Galaxy A22 4G, this chipset has undergone a complete redesign. It now includes a 5G modem, a more potent GPU, and expanded support for displays and cameras, among other things.

It is undeniably not the fastest 5G mid-range chipsets; devices on Exynos platforms with greater power include the Galaxy A33 and A53, and there are other Dimensity 920 or higher devices available. But for the A23 5G and its intended price range, the SD695 ought to be adequate.

This Snapdragon 695 5G supports mmWave 5G connectivity, is built using TSMC’s more recent 6nm manufacturing process, and includes an updated CPU (A78) and GPU. Two Kryo 660 Gold (Cortex-A78) and six Kryo 660 Silver (Cortex-A55) cores, each operating at 2.2 GHz, make up the SD695’s octa-core processor.

A more recent Adreno 619 GPU is available in the Galaxy A23 5G with its SD695 processor (vs. Adreno 610 on the A23 4G).

There are three RAM options for the Galaxy A23 5G: 4GB, 6GB, and 8GB. 64GB and 128GB of storage are available options.

Aside from dual 5G, the SD695 chip also supports Wi-Fi 5, Bluetooth 5.1, NFC, and GPS. There is space for improvement because some of the rival MediaTek chips offer Wi-Fi 6.

The Galaxy A23 5G has a fully acceptable chipset, according to the Geekbench 5 tests. The results are comparable to those of its rivals.

The GPU performance is inferior to that of the Mali-G68 GPU found in the Exynos 1280 5G chip (Galaxy A33, A53), Dimensity 920 5G (Realme 9 Pro+), Dimensity 1080 5G (Realme 10 Pro+), and Dimensity 920 5G. However, it still seems to be a reliable performer in this area.

Additionally succeeding in our stress tests, the Galaxy A23 5G guarantees long-lasting continuous performance. The phone got 80% on the CPU stability test and 99.7% on the GPU stability test.

Running either of these tests caused it to only become slightly warm rather than hot.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Cpu
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Gpu test
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Gpu test

Though the synthetic benchmarks show the class to be performing well, there is something you cannot initially know about: the performance in actual use, the day-to-day operations you so heavily rely upon. The Galaxy A23 5G falls short here.

The Galaxy A23 5G becomes slow and occasionally exhibits a perceptible lag or delay once you set up the phone, add all of your accounts and contacts, and begin capturing photos and videos. A non-Night Mode shot takes 5 seconds to snap, and it takes some time for the Gallery, Facebook, and your contacts to load. There is always some loading and waiting, even stuttering if you’re feeling impatient.

We can only speculate as to the cause of this sluggishness, but it’s possible that Android and One UI won’t run smoothly enough with just 4GB of RAM once your phone is fully loaded with apps and information. We may advise you to select the 6GB or even 8GB RAM option if you decide to use the A23 5G as your daily driver. Performance-wise, the 4GB RAM version just doesn’t seem to cut it. While it’s bearable for a review week, you’d have to live with this strange occurrence for at least a year or two.

Camera

The four cameras on the Galaxy A23 5G are identical to those on the Galaxy A23, and while it’s a simple setup, we do like having OIS on the primary camera. A 50MP OIS primary camera, a 5MP ultrawide camera, a 2MP macro eye, and a 2MP depth sensor are all present and correct on the A23 5G. In the notch on the opposite side, there is also an 8MP selfie camera.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

The 50MP Samsung JN1 sensor used in the primary camera has a Tetracell colour filter (also known as a Quad Bayer in Samsung lingo). It has 0.64 m pixels (0.28 m with 4-to-1 binning) and is a 1/2.76″ type. Behind a 26mm f/1.8 optically stabilised lens is the sensor. There is, of course, PDAF available. The only camera that supports Night Mode is this one.

The ultrawide camera has a 13mm f/2.2 lens and a 5MP GalaxyCore 5035 sensor. Infinity is the fixed focal point.

The 2MP GalaxyCore GC02 sensors are used in the macro and depth cameras. The 26mm f/2.4 lens on the macro camera has a fixed focus distance of 4-5 cm.

The selfie camera has a 25mm f/2.2 lens and an 8MP GalaxyCore sensor with 1.12 m pixels. Once more, the emphasis is fixed.

The camera app is the same as what you would get on a modern Samsung phone. All of the various modes may be switched between by swiping left and right, and some of the modes can be moved around or eliminated entirely from the viewfinder. Both horizontal and vertical swipes will toggle between the front and back cameras.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Camera App
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

You can fine-tune the cameras using the settings icon, which is in the upper left corner of the screen. Given that there aren’t many options overall, there aren’t distinct settings windows for photos and movies. The typical information is available, such as gridlines and location information. The Scene Optimizer can also be turned on and off. Even after turning it on, you must turn it back on using the main UI. Remember that.

On the main camera only, Night Mode is functional. There is a Pro mode for the primary camera as well, although it is rather rudimentary and does not allow you to change the focus’s shutter speed. ISO, exposure compensation, and white balance are all things you may modify.

It is a little counterintuitive that the aspect selections on the primary are what activate the full resolution mode.

Daylight photos

The primary camera of the Samsung Galaxy A23 5G automatically saves 12.5MP images. The test photos we took on the gorgeous autumn day ended out beautifully. There is excellent contrast, little noise, lots of resolved information, and a good dynamic range. Additionally, the colours are realistic.

Even though the corners are soft and the camera might struggle to capture some of the finer details, we still think the pictures are really nice.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
main Camera, 12.5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Main camera, 12.5MP

Although the viewfinder has a dedicated 2x toggle, there is no high-quality digital zoom available. Just upscaled crops from the regular output are used in the 2x zoomed photographs.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
2x Main camera, 12.5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

The aspect ratio menu weirdly contains a separate 50MP preset. The unbinned images are ok, but nothing really noteworthy or practical in real life. The detail is average, but the file size is enormous.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Main Camera, 50MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

As simple as they come, the 5MP ultrawide camera. The dynamic range and contrast are both acceptable. Low levels of noise are maintained, and the automatic corner distortion correction is effective. However, the colours are drab and the resolved detail is quite low. Not a fantastic showing all around.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Ultra-wide camera, 5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Ultra-wide camera, 5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Ultra-wide camera, 5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Ultra-wide camera, 5MP

A 2MP depth sensor is included in the Galaxy A23 5G, which helps the main camera when taking pictures. And they came out unexpectedly well; the subjects are sharp and well-defined, well-exposed, with pleasing colours, and little noise.

Although not flagship-worthy, the subject separation is still quite strong, and the generated blur is really believable.

Additionally, the Galaxy A23 5G has a 2MP macro camera with a fixed focus at 4 cm. Unfortunately, the images don’t really wow; the detail is weak and the colours are a little wrong, but the contrast and dynamic range are good.

The fixed focus continues to be the main problem; it’s challenging to position your subject in the sweet spot of the camera, so you’ll need to shoot numerous pictures just to be sure.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Macro camera, 2MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

When the lighting is optimal, the 8MP selfie camera captures sharp selfies, but when the lighting is less than ideal, it takes noisy, smeared images. The selfies we took while moving around our office at noon are noisy, have average detail, and occasionally have inaccurate colours. However, they are perfect for posting on social media, even though the image quality won’t stand up to close inspection.

Low-light photos

It turns out that the lax processing of the main camera is ideal for low-light situations. The images have high contrast and a passable dynamic range, and they are nicely detailed. There are a few instances of clipped highlights since HDR or Night Mode are not used. The only drawback is the colour rendering; everything appears to be either desaturated or too reddish.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Main camera, 12.5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Main camera Night Mode, 12.5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Main camera Night Mode, 12.5MP

Only the primary camera may use the Night Mode, which takes two seconds to shoot and three seconds to save. It fixes the clipped highlights and makes some shadows more detailed. Additionally, the Night Mode contributes to a more lifelike colour saturation. Sadly, the images came out softer than we had anticipated.

However, we believe the Night Mode photographs have better colours and highlights, and we advise using this function whenever it is available.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Main camera Night Mode, 12.5MP

Here are a number of 2x zoomed low-light images that have been upscaled from the originals.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
2x Main camera, 12.5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

The best we can say about the 5MP ultrawide shots we took at night is that they have good exposure. The colours are also off, the resolved detail is poor, and noise reduction has blurred both noise and detail.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Ultra-wide camera, 5MP
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Samsung Galaxy A23 5G
Ultra-wide camera, 5MP

Video recording

The primary, ultrawide, and selfie cameras of the Samsung Galaxy A23 5G can record videos at up to [email protected]

For the primary camera, optical stabilisation is offered. On the primary and ultrawide cameras, electronic stabilisation is an optional feature; however, there is no real-time preview; you can only check the outcome after your video has been stored.

Our verdict

The Samsung Galaxy A23 5G is a well-rounded smartphone with a fluid screen, appealing design, enough technology, lots of cameras, a sizable battery, and a battery that charges rather quickly. We value the most recent software package and a variety of fan favourites, including a separate microSD slot, a 3.5mm audio jack, NFC, and even the traditional notch design.

Even while the 4GB RAM model is a little underwhelming in terms of performance, it is also the more affordable option, thus it makes sense to get it. The Galaxy A33 is already in the range of the higher-tier Galaxy A23s, and it is superior in practically every reg poard.

Samsung Galaxy A23 5G

The Galaxy A23 5G falls short in this regard since it lacks too many functions, and you can purchase better phones by just investing an additional $30 to $50 to the A23 5G’s asking price. If you increased your budget just a little bit, you could add a proximity sensor, an ambient light sensor, 4K video recording, and water resistance. You could also improve the screen’s brightness for an LCD.

However, if you can locate the Galaxy A23 5G on sale for under $200, it will be well worth the money because there is no phone that can compete with it, stutter or no stutter.

Pro’s & con’s

Pro

  • robust and gripping construction.
  • Wide colour gamut, smooth 120Hz display, good accuracy.
  • Excellent battery life and quick charging.
  • One UI 5 on the most recent Android 13.
  • Suitable chipset, outstanding stability.
  • The primary camera has excellent photo and video quality.
  • 5G, microSD, a 3.5mm audio connector, NFC, dual SIM.

Con’s

  • A phone without OLED or ingress protection is an A phone.
  • not as bright a screen as those of rival products.
  • The 4GB model has a slow user interface.
  • without stereo speakers.
  • The ambient light and virtual proximity sensors are less trustworthy.

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